The study room

In essence I wish for the Bodhisattva - the Enlightened Existence.
"I have written the truth: if any person has heard of things contrary to those I have just stated, were they a thousand times proved, he has heard calumny and falsehood; and if he refuses thoroughly to examine and compare them with me whilst I am alive, he is not a friend either to justice or truth. For my part, I openly, and without the least fear declare, that whoever, even without having read my works, shall have examined with his own eyes, my disposition, character, manners, inclinations, pleasures, and habits, and pronounce me a dishonest man, is himself one who deserves a gibbet."
- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Confessions
Image, Rousseau at the hermatige (1761)

"I have written the truth: if any person has heard of things contrary to those I have just stated, were they a thousand times proved, he has heard calumny and falsehood; and if he refuses thoroughly to examine and compare them with me whilst I am alive, he is not a friend either to justice or truth. For my part, I openly, and without the least fear declare, that whoever, even without having read my works, shall have examined with his own eyes, my disposition, character, manners, inclinations, pleasures, and habits, and pronounce me a dishonest man, is himself one who deserves a gibbet."

- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Confessions

Image, Rousseau at the hermatige (1761)

"The popular insurrection that ends with the death of a Sultan is as lawful an act by which he disposed, the day before, of the lives and fortunes of his subjects. As he was maintained by force alone, it is force that overthrows him."
-Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Origin of Inequality (1754)

"The popular insurrection that ends with the death of a Sultan is as lawful an act by which he disposed, the day before, of the lives and fortunes of his subjects. As he was maintained by force alone, it is force that overthrows him."

-Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Origin of Inequality (1754)

"The disasters of an unsuccessful war, all of which proceeded from a fault in the government; the incredible confusion in the finances; the perpetual drawings upon the treasury by the administration, which was then divided between two or three ministers, amongst whom reigned nothing but discord, and who, to counteract the operations of each other, let the kingdom go to ruin; the discontent of the people, and of every other rank of subjects; the obstinacy of a woman who, constantly sacrificing her judgment, if she indeed possessed any, to her inclinations, kept from public employment persons capable of discharging the duties of them, to place in them such as pleased her best; everything occurred in justifying the foresight of the counsellor, that of the public, and my own. This, made me several times consider whether or not I myself should seek an asylum out of the kingdom before it was torn by the dissensions by which it seemed to be threatened; but relieved from my fears by my insignificance, and the peacefulness of my disposition, I thought that in the state of solitude in which I was determined to live, no public commotion could reach me."
- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Confessions [In reference to the defeat after the Seven Years War, and the onsetting French revolution]

"The disasters of an unsuccessful war, all of which proceeded from a fault in the government; the incredible confusion in the finances; the perpetual drawings upon the treasury by the administration, which was then divided between two or three ministers, amongst whom reigned nothing but discord, and who, to counteract the operations of each other, let the kingdom go to ruin; the discontent of the people, and of every other rank of subjects; the obstinacy of a woman who, constantly sacrificing her judgment, if she indeed possessed any, to her inclinations, kept from public employment persons capable of discharging the duties of them, to place in them such as pleased her best; everything occurred in justifying the foresight of the counsellor, that of the public, and my own. This, made me several times consider whether or not I myself should seek an asylum out of the kingdom before it was torn by the dissensions by which it seemed to be threatened; but relieved from my fears by my insignificance, and the peacefulness of my disposition, I thought that in the state of solitude in which I was determined to live, no public commotion could reach me."

- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Confessions [In reference to the defeat after the Seven Years War, and the onsetting French revolution]

"I have rarely done anything I should not, but unfortunately I have still more rarely done what I should."
_ Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Confessions
Van Gogh, Roulin Family portraits, 1888

"I have rarely done anything I should not, but unfortunately I have still more rarely done what I should."

_ Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Confessions

Van Gogh, Roulin Family portraits, 1888

"I should never have believed that anyone could take such pride in the art of killing a man."
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Confessions

"I should never have believed that anyone could take such pride in the art of killing a man."

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Confessions

"I have never believed that man’s freedom consisted in doing what he wants to do, but rather in never doing what he does not want to do […].
- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Revelries of the Solitary Walker (1770)

"I have never believed that man’s freedom consisted in doing what he wants to do, but rather in never doing what he does not want to do […].

- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Revelries of the Solitary Walker (1770)

"It is in one’s youth that one should study wisdom; in one’s old age one should practice it."
- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Revelries of the Solitary Walker (1770)
Painting Van Gogh

"It is in one’s youth that one should study wisdom; in one’s old age one should practice it."

- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Revelries of the Solitary Walker (1770)

Painting Van Gogh

"If it were only a question of the partner of her youth, her choice would soon be made; but a master for life is not so easily chosen; and since the two cannot be separated, people must often wait and sacrifice their youth before they find the man with whom they could spend their life. Such was Sophy’s case; she wanted a lover, but this lover must be her husband; and to discover a heart such as she required, a lover and husband were equally difficult to find. All these dashing young men were only her equals in age, in everything else they were found lacking; their empty wit, their vanity, their affectations of speech, their ill-regulated conduct, their frivolous imitations alike disgusted her. She sought a man and she found monkeys; she sought a soul and there was none to be found."
- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile, or On Education (1762)
I don’t know about Sophie, I think like that with women.

"If it were only a question of the partner of her youth, her choice would soon be made; but a master for life is not so easily chosen; and since the two cannot be separated, people must often wait and sacrifice their youth before they find the man with whom they could spend their life. Such was Sophy’s case; she wanted a lover, but this lover must be her husband; and to discover a heart such as she required, a lover and husband were equally difficult to find. All these dashing young men were only her equals in age, in everything else they were found lacking; their empty wit, their vanity, their affectations of speech, their ill-regulated conduct, their frivolous imitations alike disgusted her. She sought a man and she found monkeys; she sought a soul and there was none to be found."

- Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile, or On Education (1762)

I don’t know about Sophie, I think like that with women.

"O Man! seek no further for the author of evil; thou art he. Thereis no evil but the evil you do or the evil you suffer, and bothcome from yourself. Evil in general can only spring from disorder,and in the order of the world I find a never failing system. Evilin particular cases exists only in the mind of those who experienceit; and this feeling is not the gift of nature, but the work ofman himself. Pain has little power over those who, having thoughtlittle, look neither before nor after. Take away our fatal progress,take away our faults and our vices, take away man’s handiwork, andall is well.”
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile, or On Education (Profession of Faith of a Savouyard Vicar)

"O Man! seek no further for the author of evil; thou art he. There
is no evil but the evil you do or the evil you suffer, and both
come from yourself. Evil in general can only spring from disorder,
and in the order of the world I find a never failing system. Evil
in particular cases exists only in the mind of those who experience
it; and this feeling is not the gift of nature, but the work of
man himself. Pain has little power over those who, having thought
little, look neither before nor after. Take away our fatal progress,
take away our faults and our vices, take away man’s handiwork, and
all is well.”

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile, or On Education (Profession of Faith of a Savouyard Vicar)

"To complain that God does not prevent us from doing wrongis to complain because he has made man of so excellent a nature,that he has endowed his actions with that morality by which theyare ennobled, that he has made virtue man’s birthright.”
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile, or On Education (Profession of Faith of a Savouyard Vicar)

"To complain that God does not prevent us from doing wrong
is to complain because he has made man of so excellent a nature,
that he has endowed his actions with that morality by which they
are ennobled, that he has made virtue man’s birthright.”

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile, or On Education (Profession of Faith of a Savouyard Vicar)