The study room

In essence I wish for the Bodhisattva - the Enlightened Existence.
"In a word, as he had all the wickedness against which damnation is denounced and for hell-fire is prepared, so he had some virtues which have caused the memory of some men in all ages to be celebrated; and he will be looked upon by posterity as a brave mad man."
Edward Hyde on Oliver Cromwell (II), The History of the Rebellion
Satirical depiction of Cromwell

"In a word, as he had all the wickedness against which damnation is denounced and for hell-fire is prepared, so he had some virtues which have caused the memory of some men in all ages to be celebrated; and he will be looked upon by posterity as a brave mad man."

Edward Hyde on Oliver Cromwell (II), The History of the Rebellion

Satirical depiction of Cromwell

"Without doubt, no man with more wickedness ever attempted any thing, or brought to pass what he desired more wickedly, more in the face and contempt of religion and moral honesty; yet wickedness as great as his could never have accomplished those trophies without the assistance of a great spirit, an admirablecircumspection and sagacity, and a most magnanimous resolution."
Edward Hyde on Oliver Cromwell, The History of the Rebellion (1702-04)
Cromwell, 1645

"Without doubt, no man with more wickedness ever attempted any thing, or brought to pass what he desired more wickedly, more in the face and contempt of religion and moral honesty; yet wickedness as great as his could never have accomplished those trophies without the assistance of a great spirit, an admirablecircumspection and sagacity, and a most magnanimous resolution."

Edward Hyde on Oliver Cromwell, The History of the Rebellion (1702-04)

Cromwell, 1645

”[…he] looked those who were to execute him in the face; and thinking they stood at too great a distance, spake to them to come nearer; to which one of them said, “I’ll warrent you, sir, we’ll hit you:” to which he answered smiling, “friends, I have been nearer you when you have missed me.[…] Now do you worst.”
Edward Hyde on Sir George Lisel’s execution (1610-1648), The History of the Rebellion (1702-04)

”[…he] looked those who were to execute him in the face; and thinking they stood at too great a distance, spake to them to come nearer; to which one of them said, “I’ll warrent you, sir, we’ll hit you:” to which he answered smiling, “friends, I have been nearer you when you have missed me.[…] Now do you worst.”

Edward Hyde on Sir George Lisel’s execution¬†(1610-1648), The History of the Rebellion (1702-04)

"The seamen were a nation by themselves, a humorous and fantastic people; fierce and rude, and resolute, in whatsoever they resolve or are inclined to, but unsteady and unconstant in persuing it, and jealous of those tomorrow by whom they are governed this day."
- Hyde on the navy mutiny in Kent, 1648
Edward Hyde, History of the Rebellion (1702-04)
Painting, Dover Castle (1837)

"The seamen were a nation by themselves, a humorous and fantastic people; fierce and rude, and resolute, in whatsoever they resolve or are inclined to, but unsteady and unconstant in persuing it, and jealous of those tomorrow by whom they are governed this day."

- Hyde on the navy mutiny in Kent, 1648


Edward Hyde, History of the Rebellion (1702-04)

Painting, Dover Castle (1837)

”[…] if the sermons of those times preached in court were collected and published, the world would recieve the best bulk of orthodox divinity, profound learning, convincing reason, natural powerful eloquence and admirable devotion, that hath been communicated in any age since the Apostles’ time.”
 - Edward Hyde, on the court before the Civil Wars, The History of the Rebellion (1702-04)

”[…] if the sermons of those times preached in court were collected and published, the world would recieve the best bulk of orthodox divinity, profound learning, convincing reason, natural powerful eloquence and admirable devotion, that hath been communicated in any age since the Apostles’ time.”

 - Edward Hyde, on the court before the Civil Wars, The History of the Rebellion (1702-04)

"There are monuments enough in the sedicious sermons at that time printed, and in the memories of men of others not printed, of such wresting and perverting scripture to the odious purposes of the preacher, that pious men will not look over without trembling."
"And indeed no good Christian can without horror think of those ministers of the Church, who, by their function being messengers of peace, are the only trumpets of war and incendaries towards rebellion."
Edward Hyde, The History of the rebellion (1702-04)

"There are monuments enough in the sedicious sermons at that time printed, and in the memories of men of others not printed, of such wresting and perverting scripture to the odious purposes of the preacher, that pious men will not look over without trembling."

"And indeed no good Christian can without horror think of those ministers of the Church, who, by their function being messengers of peace, are the only trumpets of war and incendaries towards rebellion."

Edward Hyde, The History of the rebellion (1702-04)

"I do not think one man wise enough to govern us all."
- Harry Marten, in Edward Hyde’s The History of the Rebellion (1702-04)
Painting, Eve of the Battle of Edgehill (1642), by Charles Landseer

"I do not think one man wise enough to govern us all."

- Harry Marten, in Edward Hyde’s The History of the Rebellion (1702-04)

Painting, Eve of the Battle of Edgehill (1642), by Charles Landseer