The study room

In essence I wish for the Bodhisattva - the Enlightened Existence.
"To a real wise man the judicious and well-weighed approbation of a single wise man, gives more heart-felt satisfaction than all the noisy applauses of ten thousand ignorant though enthusiastic admirers."
Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759)

"To a real wise man the judicious and well-weighed approbation of a single wise man, gives more heart-felt satisfaction than all the noisy applauses of ten thousand ignorant though enthusiastic admirers."

Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759)

"To this universal benevolence, on the contrary, the very suspicion of a fatherless wrold, must be the most meloncholy of all reflections; from the thought that all the unknown regions of infinite and incoprehensible space may be filled with nothing but endless misery and wretchedness. All the spleandour of the highest prosperity can never enlighten the gloom with which so dreadful an idea must necessarily over-shadow the imagination; nor, in a wise and virtuous man, can all the sorrow of the most afflicting adversity ever dry up the joy which necessarily springs from the habitual and thorough conviction of the truth of the contrary system."
Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759)
Vincent Van Gogh

"To this universal benevolence, on the contrary, the very suspicion of a fatherless wrold, must be the most meloncholy of all reflections; from the thought that all the unknown regions of infinite and incoprehensible space may be filled with nothing but endless misery and wretchedness. All the spleandour of the highest prosperity can never enlighten the gloom with which so dreadful an idea must necessarily over-shadow the imagination; nor, in a wise and virtuous man, can all the sorrow of the most afflicting adversity ever dry up the joy which necessarily springs from the habitual and thorough conviction of the truth of the contrary system."

Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759)

Vincent Van Gogh

"During the ignorance and darkness of pagan superstition, mankind seem to have formed the ideas of their divinities with so little delicacy, that they ascribed to them, indiscriminately, all the passions of human nature, those not excepted which do the least honour to our species, such as lust, hunger, avarice, envy, revenge. They could not fail, therefore, to ascribe to those beings, for the excellence of whose nature they still conceived the highest admiration, those sentiments and qualities which are the great ornaments of humanity, and which seem to raise it to a resemblance of divine perfection, the love of virtue and beneficence, and the abhorrence of vice and injustice. The man who was injured, called upon Jupiter to be witness of the wrong that was done to him, and could not doubt, but that divine being would behold it with the same indignation which would animate the meanest of mankind, who looked on when injustice was committed. The man who did the injury, felt himself to be the proper object of the detestation and resentment of mankind; and his natural fears led him to impute the same sentiments to those awful beings, whose presence he could not avoid, and whose power he could not resist. These natural hopes and fears, and suspicions, were propagated by sympathy, and confirmed by education; and the gods were universally represented and believed to be the rewarders of humanity and mercy, and the avengers of perfidy and injustice. And thus religion, even in its rudest form, gave a sanction to the rules of morality, long before the age of artificial reasoning and philosophy. That the terrors of religion should thus enforce the natural sense of duty, was of too much importance to the happiness of mankind, for nature to leave it dependent upon the slowness and uncertainty of philosophical researches."
- Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) 

"During the ignorance and darkness of pagan superstition, mankind seem to have formed the ideas of their divinities with so little delicacy, that they ascribed to them, indiscriminately, all the passions of human nature, those not excepted which do the least honour to our species, such as lust, hunger, avarice, envy, revenge. They could not fail, therefore, to ascribe to those beings, for the excellence of whose nature they still conceived the highest admiration, those sentiments and qualities which are the great ornaments of humanity, and which seem to raise it to a resemblance of divine perfection, the love of virtue and beneficence, and the abhorrence of vice and injustice. The man who was injured, called upon Jupiter to be witness of the wrong that was done to him, and could not doubt, but that divine being would behold it with the same indignation which would animate the meanest of mankind, who looked on when injustice was committed. The man who did the injury, felt himself to be the proper object of the detestation and resentment of mankind; and his natural fears led him to impute the same sentiments to those awful beings, whose presence he could not avoid, and whose power he could not resist. These natural hopes and fears, and suspicions, were propagated by sympathy, and confirmed by education; and the gods were universally represented and believed to be the rewarders of humanity and mercy, and the avengers of perfidy and injustice. And thus religion, even in its rudest form, gave a sanction to the rules of morality, long before the age of artificial reasoning and philosophy. That the terrors of religion should thus enforce the natural sense of duty, was of too much importance to the happiness of mankind, for nature to leave it dependent upon the slowness and uncertainty of philosophical researches."

- Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) 

"Are you in adversity? Do not mourn in the darkness of solitude, do not regulate your sorrow according to the indulgent sympathy of your intimate friends; return, as soon as possible, to the day-light of the world and of society. Live with strangers, with those who know nothing, or care nothing about your misfortune; do not even shun the company of enemies; but give yourself the pleasure of mortifying their malignant joy, by making them feel how little you are affected by your calamity, and how much you are above it. "
- Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759)

"Are you in adversity? Do not mourn in the darkness of solitude, do not regulate your sorrow according to the indulgent sympathy of your intimate friends; return, as soon as possible, to the day-light of the world and of society. Live with strangers, with those who know nothing, or care nothing about your misfortune; do not even shun the company of enemies; but give yourself the pleasure of mortifying their malignant joy, by making them feel how little you are affected by your calamity, and how much you are above it. "

- Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759)

"Men have voluntarily thrown away life to aquire after death a renown which they could no longer enjoy."
- Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759)
Adam Smith (1723 – 1790)

"Men have voluntarily thrown away life to aquire after death a renown which they could no longer enjoy."

- Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759)

Adam Smith (1723 – 1790)