The study room

In essence I wish for the Bodhisattva - the Enlightened Existence.
He who drinks the waters of truth, he rests in joy with mind serene. The wise find their delight in the DHAMMA, in the truth revealed by the great.
The Wise Man
Neither in the sky, nor deep in the ocean, nor in a mountain cave, nor  anywhere, can a man be free from the evil he has done.
Good & Evil
Dhammapada

He who drinks the waters of truth, he rests in joy with mind serene. The wise find their delight in the DHAMMA, in the truth revealed by the great.

The Wise Man

Neither in the sky, nor deep in the ocean, nor in a mountain cave, norĀ  anywhere, can a man be free from the evil he has done.

Good & Evil

Dhammapada

"Evil exists in the world not to create despair, but activity…It is not only the interest but the duty of every individual to use his utmost efforts to remove evil from himself and from as large a circle as he can influence; and the more he exercises himself in his duty, the more wisely he directs his efforts, and the more sucsessful these efforts are, the more he will improve and exalt his own mind, and the more completely does he appear to fulfill the will of his Creator."
Thomas Malthus, 1798, An Essay on the Principle of Population

"Evil exists in the world not to create despair, but activity…It is not only the interest but the duty of every individual to use his utmost efforts to remove evil from himself and from as large a circle as he can influence; and the more he exercises himself in his duty, the more wisely he directs his efforts, and the more sucsessful these efforts are, the more he will improve and exalt his own mind, and the more completely does he appear to fulfill the will of his Creator."

Thomas Malthus, 1798, An Essay on the Principle of Population

"O Man! seek no further for the author of evil; thou art he. Thereis no evil but the evil you do or the evil you suffer, and bothcome from yourself. Evil in general can only spring from disorder,and in the order of the world I find a never failing system. Evilin particular cases exists only in the mind of those who experienceit; and this feeling is not the gift of nature, but the work ofman himself. Pain has little power over those who, having thoughtlittle, look neither before nor after. Take away our fatal progress,take away our faults and our vices, take away man’s handiwork, andall is well.”
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile, or On Education (Profession of Faith of a Savouyard Vicar)

"O Man! seek no further for the author of evil; thou art he. There
is no evil but the evil you do or the evil you suffer, and both
come from yourself. Evil in general can only spring from disorder,
and in the order of the world I find a never failing system. Evil
in particular cases exists only in the mind of those who experience
it; and this feeling is not the gift of nature, but the work of
man himself. Pain has little power over those who, having thought
little, look neither before nor after. Take away our fatal progress,
take away our faults and our vices, take away man’s handiwork, and
all is well.”

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile, or On Education (Profession of Faith of a Savouyard Vicar)

”[…] our prospects are too narrow. We take, for instance, the idea of some one particular pain into our thoughts, and account it evil; whereas, if we enlarge our view, so as to comprehend the various ends, connexions, and dependencies of things, on what occasions and in what proportions we are affected with pain and pleasure, the nature of human freedom, and the design with which we are put into the world; we shall be forced to acknowledge that those particular things which, considered in themselves, appear to be evil, have the nature of good, when considered as linked with the whole system of beings.”
- George Berkely, Principles of Human Knowlege (1710)
Painting by Van Gogh

”[…] our prospects are too narrow. We take, for instance, the idea of some one particular pain into our thoughts, and account it evil; whereas, if we enlarge our view, so as to comprehend the various ends, connexions, and dependencies of things, on what occasions and in what proportions we are affected with pain and pleasure, the nature of human freedom, and the design with which we are put into the world; we shall be forced to acknowledge that those particular things which, considered in themselves, appear to be evil, have the nature of good, when considered as linked with the whole system of beings.”

- George Berkely, Principles of Human Knowlege (1710)

Painting by Van Gogh